Saturday, April 28, 2007

Things that Are of Romance (edited)

A while ago I defined romance: "According to Wikipedia, romanticism is 'an artistic and intellectual movement that originated in late 18th century Western Europe... a reaction against the rationalization of nature, in art and literature it stressed strong emotion as a source of aesthetic experience... ' Thus, to say something is romantic in this sense is to say it is emotional, slightly irrational, and adventurous."

I've recently discovered a few more examples of things that are romantic (like pirates):

  • umbrellas
  • horse-drawn carriages
  • quilts
  • (from zjramsli) the Marine Corps Hymn
  • roll top desks
  • (from believer) inkwell pens
  • (from believer) calligraphy
  • (from believer) classical music
  • (from believer) screened in porches
  • (from zjramsli) GA Henty books
  • (from zjramsli) superheroes
  • doors held open for ladies
  • old books with underlined passages and notes in the margins
  • hats (but not baseball caps)
  • candles
  • willow trees
  • bridges

Use comment section for further submissions.

To God be all glory.

9 comments:

ZJRamsli said...

* The Scarlet Pimpernel
* John Wayne
* The Marine Corps Hymn

Lisa of Longbourn said...

I'm not sure I agree with the above submissions.

I thought of another one, though: roll-top desks.

To God be all glory,
Lisa of Longbourn

Believer said...

I submit: inkwell pens, calligraphy,
classical music, and screened-in- porches.

ZJRamsli said...

You can't just say I don't agree and then not explain yourself; that's not fair. Why don’t you agree with the above submissions?

From Webster's 1828 dictionary (thought this was very interesting).Romance -- A tale of extraordinary adventure, fictitious and often extravagant, usually a tale of love or war - subjects interesting the sensibilities of the heart (emotions), or the passions of wonder and curiosity.

Now umbrellas and roll-top desks aren't romantic to me personally; though I can understand how they could be for you.
Based on the above definition my three things are very romantic (at least to me); because they are an emotional embodiment of things like: adventure, defense and protection of the defenseless, glory, honor, courage, and commitment.
And along those same lines I could add (as being romantic).
* The Apollo Space Missions
* The Star Spangled Banner
and * GA Henty books
Super Heroes are Romantic too because; like the little kid in The Incredibles; we long to see or do something incredible.

Lisa of Longbourn said...

I linked to my post about romanticism, in which I define it as: "According to Wikipedia, romanticism is 'an artistic and intellectual movement that originated in late 18th century Western Europe... a reaction against the rationalization of nature, in art and literature it stressed strong emotion as a source of aesthetic experience... ' Thus, to say something is romantic in this sense is to say it is emotional, slightly irrational, and adventurous."

I didn't want to attack your submissions, zjramsli, so I only made a small comment (disclaimer, you might say). As John Wayne is usually gruff, a dusty cowboy, and uses his fists and guns, I don't find that following the philosophy of romanticism. Almost all good music is romantic, so I've no objection to the hymn, which describes noble virtues and far-off lands. On the Scarlet Pimpernel, however, I must once again disagree. My only acquaintance with the theme is the movie with Jane Seymour, and in that the Scarlet Pimpernel is one of the most obnoxious characters I've ever watched. He may have made great political contributions, but like so many men of action, his personal life lacked depth. It didn't lack trouble, however, so the movie was neither light-hearted nor satisfying.

Space missions are filled with electronics and silly goals (who cares about landing on the moon?). Romanticism would find space (and the moon) romantic, but only as it remains mysterious.

There. Are you satisfied with my more thorough explanation? I fear you will not be, since 'he who defines wins,' and we cannot agree on definition.

To God be all glory,
Lisa of Longbourn

Lisa of Longbourn said...

More things: doors held open for a lady quite capable of holding it herself.

Old books with underlined passages and notes in the margins.

Hats (but not baseball caps).

To God be all glory,
Lisa of Longbourn

Lisa of Longbourn said...

Since I never addressed Believer's submissions, I'll say I like them, and I agree.

I'm adding more:
candles.

And I'm clarifying. I said "I'm not sure I agree with [zjramsli's] submissions." Thus the topic here is my agreement. When asked for reasons, these I gave. My reasons haven't changed. The definition hasn't changed. My opinion does not change.

I'm up for posting further submissions, but only if they are left in list form. Thank you.
To God be all glory,
Lisa of Longbourn

Lisa of Longbourn said...

"To be in a romance is to be in uncongenial surroundings."
-- G.K.Chesterton

To God be all glory,
Lisa of Longbourn

Lisa of Longbourn said...

stars
fire in a hearth
wildflowers
pocketwatches
sail ships
brown or suede leather

To God be all glory,
Lisa of Longbourn